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'''Large format''' means film that is generally at least 4x5 inches (or 9x12 cm). Film this size is generally used as individual sheets, rather than rolls as in smaller formats. (There are large rolls of film, though, used for such things as aerial photography.) Exposures on a large-format camera are made one at a time, using film loaded into film holders.
 
'''Large format''' means film that is generally at least 4x5 inches (or 9x12 cm). Film this size is generally used as individual sheets, rather than rolls as in smaller formats. (There are large rolls of film, though, used for such things as aerial photography.) Exposures on a large-format camera are made one at a time, using film loaded into film holders.
   
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While there are many varied designs of large format cameras, there are two basic varieties: the [[monorail_camera|monorail camera]], and the [[field camera]]. A monorail camera uses a single round or square tube/rail as the base of the camera on which the front and rear sections slide back and forth to accommodate lenses of different focal length. A field camera design allows the camera to fold into itself to facilitate ease of storage and transport. The monorail camera design allows for greater versatility in camera movements, such as swing and tilt, but is typically large and heavy. The field design is usually smaller and lighter, sacrificing range of motion and rigidity.
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While there are many varied designs of large format cameras, there are two basic varieties: the monorail camera, and the [[field camera]]. A monorail camera uses a single round or square tube/rail as the base of the camera on which the front and rear sections slide back and forth to accommodate lenses of different focal length. A field camera design allows the camera to fold into itself to facilitate ease of storage and transport. The monorail camera design allows for greater versatility in camera movements, such as swing and tilt, but is typically large and heavy. The field design is usually smaller and lighter, sacrificing range of motion and rigidity.
   
 
Specialized, and not as common, large format cameras come in different designs, such as the [[rangefinder_camera|rangefinder]] models made by Fotoman and other camera makers, [[pinhole_camera|pinhole]] box cameras, [[SLR|single lens reflex]] by [[Graflex]] and [[Arca-Swiss]], and even [[TLR|twin lens reflex]] designs made by photographer Peter Gowland.
 
Specialized, and not as common, large format cameras come in different designs, such as the [[rangefinder_camera|rangefinder]] models made by Fotoman and other camera makers, [[pinhole_camera|pinhole]] box cameras, [[SLR|single lens reflex]] by [[Graflex]] and [[Arca-Swiss]], and even [[TLR|twin lens reflex]] designs made by photographer Peter Gowland.

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