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Specialized, and not as common, large format cameras come in different designs, such as the [[rangefinder_camera|rangefinder]] models made by Fotoman and other camera makers, [[pinhole_camera|pinhole]] box cameras, [[SLR|single lens reflex]] by [[Graflex]] and [[Arca-Swiss]], and even [[TLR|twin lens reflex]] designs made by photographer Peter Gowland.
 
Specialized, and not as common, large format cameras come in different designs, such as the [[rangefinder_camera|rangefinder]] models made by Fotoman and other camera makers, [[pinhole_camera|pinhole]] box cameras, [[SLR|single lens reflex]] by [[Graflex]] and [[Arca-Swiss]], and even [[TLR|twin lens reflex]] designs made by photographer Peter Gowland.
   
Lenses for large format cameras range in focal length too numerous to list here, and of very different designs for a large variety of optical results. The main feature of a large format lens is that the image projection inside the camera must be large enough to accommodate the area of the film itself. This is referred to as the "image circle" and can vary according to lens focal length and design. For example, a lens with a focal length of 150mm may be designed to provide an image circle with a diameter of 230mm ([[http://www.schneideroptics.com/ecommerce/CatalogItemDetail.aspx?CID=164&IID=1830 Schneider APO-Symmar-L]]), large enough to cover a 4x5 inch sheet of film, or it may be designed to provide an image circle of 386mm in diameter ([[http://www.schneideroptics.com/ecommerce/CatalogSubCategoryDisplay.aspx?CID=169 Schneider Super Symmar-XL]]), enough to cover an 8x10 inch sheet of film. Many lens manufacturers have come and gone. As of 2009, three major manufacturers are still in production: [[Schneider]], [[Rodenstock]], and Fujinon.
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Lenses for large format cameras range in focal length too numerous to list here, and of very different designs for a large variety of optical results. The main feature of a large format lens is that the image projection inside the camera must be large enough to accommodate the area of the film itself. This is referred to as the "image circle" and can vary according to lens focal length and design. For example, a lens with a focal length 150mm may be designed to provide an image circle with a diameter of 230mm ([[http://www.schneideroptics.com/ecommerce/CatalogItemDetail.aspx?CID=164&IID=1830 Schneider APO-Symmar-L]]), large enough to cover a 4x5 inch sheet of film, or it may be designed to provide an image circle of 386mm in diameter ([[http://www.schneideroptics.com/ecommerce/CatalogSubCategoryDisplay.aspx?CID=169 Schneider Super Symmar-XL]]), enough to cover an 8x10 inch sheet of film. Many lens manufacturers have come and gone. As of 2009, three major manufacturers are still in production: [[Schneider]], [[Rodenstock]], and Fujinon.
   
 
Typical standard film sizes for large-format cameras are:
 
Typical standard film sizes for large-format cameras are:
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