Camerapedia
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Roll film, and related cartridge-based films were available in many different sizes, some of which lasted only a short time. The most popular was the longest-lived, type 120 was introduced in 1901 by Kodak, and is still (2010) available. Film size number were not used by Kodak until 1913[1]. In Japan, many film sizes had alternative names; see Japanese formats.

  1. Coe, Brian, Kodak Cameras, the First Hundred Years, Hove Foto Books, 1988, p.298

See also: Plate Sizes

problems: Autographic

Designation width Typical
Frame size
introduced withdrawn Alt. Names Notes

Medium format[]

101 3½x3½" 1895
102 1½x2" 1895
103 1897
104 5x4" 1897
105 2¼x3¼" 1897
106 3½x3½" 1898
107 3¼x4¼" 1898 rollholder
108 4¼3¼" 1898 rollholder
109 4x5" 1898 rollholder
110 (roll) 5x4" 1897 Rollholder; not to be confused with 110 cartridge
111 6½x4¾" 1898
116 70mm 2½x4¼" 1899 Vulcan No. 232
117 2¼x2¼" 1900
118 3¼×4¼" 1900 Vulcan No. 236
119 3¼×4¼" 1900
120 6cm 6x6cm, 6x9cm 1901 Brownie No.2;
Vulcan No. 210;
medium format
"The" rollfilm, introduced by Kodak
121 15/8×2½" 1902
122 3¼×5½" 1903 Vulcan No. 244
123 4×5" 1904
124 3¼×4¼" 1905 Vulcan No. 248
125 3¼×5½" Vulcan No. 250
126 (cartridge) 35mm 26x26mm 1963 2007 Instamatic;
Kodapak
Cartridge film; introduced by Kodak
126 (roll) 4½inches 1906 1949
127 4cm 4x4cm,4x6cm 1912 2009 Vest Pocket film Introduced by Kodak
128 2¼×1½" 1913
129 1913
130 27/8×47/8 1916
220 6cm 6x6cm Similar to 120, but without the paper backing, allowing double-length
616 70mm 2½x4¼" almost like 116 film but slimmer spool
620 6cm/2¼" 6x9cm/2¼×3¼" 1931 A version of 120 film with a slimmer spool, introduced by Kodak, to allow smaller cameras
70mm based on perforated movie film; alternate medium format film size
Ensign 2¼ 6cm 6x9cm Ensign version of 120
F.16 6.5x11cm (2½×4¼") Ferrania version of 116 or 616
P16 6.5x11cm (2½×4¼") Premier brand of 116
Rajar No. 6 6cm Introduced by APeM; square-drive spool
Selo 20 6cm 6x6/6x9cm Ilford version of 120
Selo 27 4cm 4x4cm Ilford version of 127
Y20 6cm 6x6/6x9cm Dufay version of 120
Z20 6cm 6x9cm Ilford brand of 620

35mm[]

135 35mm 24x36mm 35mm;
miniature
"standard" 35mm film cassettes with sprocket holes
Karat 35mm c.1936 c.1948 Agfa's predecessor to Rapid film
Rapid 35mm 1964 Rapid-load dual-cassette system introduced by Afga
SL 35mm Schnell Lade; Eastern-bloc version of Rapid film; unperforated
Bolta 35mm unperforated, paper-backed
828 35mm 28×40mm 1935 Introduced by Kodak
Ensign E10 35mm 3.5x4.5cm used by the Ensign Midget
paperbacked
35mm rollfilm
35mm used by Sida Extra, Liliput, and Unette

subminiature[]

8mm subminiature Based on 8mm cine film. A few Japanese cameras; see 8mm film category
9.5mm subminiature A few Japanese cameras such as the Doryu 1, Fujica 8×11mm SLR and the German Minox range; see 9.5mm film category
16mm subminiature several film cartridge systems, for example for Edixa 16, Kiev-30 or Minolta 16
17.5mm 14x14mm 1937 Japanese half-35mm rollfilm size for Hit-type cameras
110 (cartridge) 16mm 13x17mm 1972 2009[1] Pocket
Disc film 8x10.5mm 1982 c.1990
IX240 24mm 30.2x16.7mm 1996 APS Introduced by Kodak, Fujifilm and others

Links & References[]

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